North Carolina Hobby Farmer Plans Retirement with a Timbery Sawmill

  • By timberysales
  • 21 Jun, 2017
Dee Farmer sawing lumber for projects on his North Carolina hobby farm.
Dee Farmer sawing lumber for projects on his North Carolina hobby farm.
As retirement nears for Edward “Dee” Farmer, the Clayton, North Carolina law enforcement officer and hobby farmer plans to continue serving his community by turning logs into valuable lumber. “I am seeing trees in my neighborhood being cut and carried away to landfills or cut into firewood and I began to think I could take wasted trees and turn them into something more useful,” said Dee. “That is when I started researching for my sawmill.”
  
During his childhood, Dee developed lifelong interests in horticulture and forestry that he plans to continue pursuing in his retirement years. “Growing up on my grandmother’s farm in Western North Carolina as a young child I would visit and watch a sawmill that was set up on her farm,” shared Dee. “A family friend owned and ran the sawmill. He used a horse to drag selected logs to the mill. I would sit on a nearby tree stump and watch the cart go back and forth turning logs into lumber. I guess this is where the seed was sown.”
Dee recently purchased a Timbery M100 sawmill in order to learn how to turn logs into lumber. As part of his learning process, Dee says he is utilizing his Timbery to mill boards for his own use in building a permanent 10’ x 30’ shelter for the mill. Dee and his wife also live on a 2 ½ acre hobby farm with Pygmy and Myotonic goats along with four full chicken coops. “I also find myself using a lot of milled and air dried lumber for our hobby farm, using the lumber for new goat stalls, food shelving, and board and batten chicken coops,” said Dee. “After completing the mill shelter, I plan to build a small shed near the mill for convenient peavey, cant hook, blades, and other tool storage. I plan to use all lumber milled on site for this project.”
Dee intends to eventually purchase a larger, towable sawmill for retirement income, but a friend convinced Dee of the value of learning a new skill from the ground up. “I’m a few years away from retirement, and wanted to start early with a manual mill to learn the wood hands on and direct before going to a larger mill,” said Dee. “My initial plan when purchasing the M100 was similar to my machinist friend’s path. I planned to work with a manual mill, close to the log and lumber, to learn and become efficient using a portable mill. Now I plan to continue to use my M100 for my personal use and mill for friends and neighbors to gain additional knowledge and experience.”
Dee’s advice to others considering a sawmill includes thinking about your goals and purpose for a sawmill while speaking with as many companies as possible. More tips include seeing what’s available for service along with how and whom you contact for assistance, parts, accessories or advice. “I researched portable mills for over a year before I decided on the Timbery,” explained Dee. “I met with sales representatives at trade shows, open houses, and public demonstrations. I met Chad Sanders [manager] with Timbery while he was attending an agriculture equipment show in Raleigh. He demonstrated the Timbery products for me and was very friendly and shared his knowledge and practicality of the mill. I also met my local Timbery dealer, Joseph Whitley and his staff, that only added to the benefits of the purchase. The combination of my intended milling purposes, price, and a local sales and service center is why I chose the Timbery M100. As we say down south, Joseph and his staff was the gravy on the biscuit.”
Dee says he gets important benefits other than lumber out of sawmilling. “In addition to the rewards of turning logs that could have been thrown away into useful lumber, I enjoy the physical manual labor,” said Dee. “I enjoy the time milling, releasing stress after a long day or week. I go out to the mill and as I slab away and turn a log into a cant and then lumber, I feel the stress melting away. The sawdust therapy I receive is immeasurable. Being able to open a log and see the grains hidden inside, and turn a log into useful lumber or a future weekend project is highly rewarding for me. A bonus for me is the transformation back to that time I used to sit upon that tree stump.”

Timbery Sawmills

By timberysales 21 Jun, 2017
As retirement nears for Edward “Dee” Farmer, the Clayton, North Carolina law enforcement officer and hobby farmer plans to continue serving his community by turning logs into valuable lumber. “I am seeing trees in my neighborhood being cut and carried away to landfills or cut into firewood and I began to think I could take wasted trees and turn them into something more useful,” said Dee. “That is when I started researching for my sawmill.”
  
During his childhood, Dee developed lifelong interests in horticulture and forestry that he plans to continue pursuing in his retirement years. “Growing up on my grandmother’s farm in Western North Carolina as a young child I would visit and watch a sawmill that was set up on her farm,” shared Dee. “A family friend owned and ran the sawmill. He used a horse to drag selected logs to the mill. I would sit on a nearby tree stump and watch the cart go back and forth turning logs into lumber. I guess this is where the seed was sown.”
By timberysales 14 Mar, 2017
Bruce McEwen of Renaissance Furniture Restoration has a variety of interests, a broad skill set, and an always inquiring mind. In Foresters Falls, Ontario, Bruce runs a hobby farm, works as a professional sheep shearer, restores treasured pieces of furniture, creates unique furniture, and operates a portable band sawmill service in the small towns and rural areas of Ontario’s famed Whitewater region. Bruce says he comes by his versatility naturally. While growing up on a dairy farm, Bruce learned from both his mom and his dad who was a skilled engineer serving in WWII. “He was super handy, just great at solving problems,” Bruce remembers. “I built many things with my dad from wagons to fences to out buildings. I learned from him that the ability to fix things is a gift. It’s a gift I have to use and I am so grateful for the chance I have to do useful and rewarding work.”

By timberysales 25 Jan, 2017
Twin brothers Bob and Ken Snyder have been passionate about woodworking throughout their entire lives. Beginning the craft at a young age, the Snyder’s particularly enjoy the creative process in turning lumber into toys, furniture, crafts, and other products they make to sell, give away, or keep for the enjoyment of themselves and their families. With their expertise in crafting a wide variety of toys including trains, 3D puzzles, and space crafts, it is fitting that the New Jersey natives converted an outdoor playground structure to house the Timbery M100 portable band sawmill they use to mill their own lumber for their woodworking projects. Likening the playground set up to a different kind of man cave, Bob says, “It’s like an outdoors man compound, friends come over to watch us saw logs and they end up enjoying our mill as much as we do!”

Bob and Ken began working with wood more than 40 years ago, responding to the influences of their father, Richard. “Dad always said that hard work is the best thing for you,” Bob says. “We were selling light bulbs at seven [years old] and using our dad’s basement workshop to make toys to sell when we were twelve.” According to Bob, their grandfather Earle also had a formative influence on the two men’s lives. Earle was a toy maker himself so many of the toys the boys made were based on patterns their grandfather had developed and much of what the boys learned about crafting wood and designing new wood products came under Earle’s mentorship. As the two learned more they began to expand their efforts, developing their own designs and making more elaborate toys.

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